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Delegate Package

Cinema, Soft Power and Geo-Political Change

£90.00

Description

Delegate Package - £90

 

Detailed Description

This international conference seeks to bring together scholars of soft power and audiovisual culture in the context of both emerging nations and geo-political shifts more broadly in the 21st century. It will explore the implications for global film culture of the apparent shift in power relations between the developed and developing world, along with the increasing emphasis national and transnational organisations place on the role of ‘soft power’ in global foreign policy. The diverse, and often competing ways nations engage with film as a medium of artistic expression, on the one hand, and a soft power/cultural diplomacy/nation-branding ‘resource’ on the other, along with the wider implications for world cinemas of these nations’ very different, and dynamic, positions within the global media landscape, remain to be investigated comparatively. Thus the time is clearly ripe to explore in greater detail the employment of soft-power strategies by emerging nations, and how developed nations are adjusting their presence in the global media landscape, in order to nuance discussions on what successful soft power ‘looks like’ in different parts of the globe, and by providing analysis from the perspective of film culture.

The conference programme will include film-related events - screenings, Q&As with directors and round-table discussions with festival organisers.  

Confirmed speakers: Stephanie Dennison, University of Leeds; Rachel Dwyer, SOAS (London); Paul Cooke, University of Leeds; Chris Homewood, University of Leeds; Andrew Higson, University of York; Song Hwee Lim, Chinese University of Hong Kong; Alessandra Meleiro, UFSCar, Brazil; Stephen Norris, Miami University of Ohio; Vlad Strukov, University of Leeds; Daya Thussu, University of Westminster.

The conference is the culmination of an AHRC-funded research network based at The University of Leeds’ Centre for World Cinemas & Digital Cultures that looka at the implications for global film culture of the apparent shift in power relations between the developed and developing world, along with the increasing emphasis national and transnational organisations place on the role of ‘soft power’ in global foreign policy, focussing specifically on the BRICS.

For more information: https://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/homepage/530/soft_power_cinema_and_the_brics

Enquiries: soft.power@leeds.ac.uk

Twitter: @leedscwcdc (Centre for World Cinemas & Digital Cultures)

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/worldcinemasatleeds/

#SPCinemaBRICS